In an effort to re-establish its price leadership position, Walmart has launched a new advertising campaign with the slogan “Low prices. Every Day. On everything.”


Walmart, advertising campaign, everyday low prices, Duncan Mac Naughton, EDLP, ad match policy, advertising campaign, discount store, merchandising, grocery, Greg Jacobson
































































































































































INSIDE THIS ISSUE
News
Opinion
Other Services
Reprints / E-Prints
Submit News
White Papers

Retail News Breaks Archives

Walmart brings back products, beats EDLP drum

April 12th, 2011

BENTONVILLE, Ark. – In an effort to re-establish its price leadership position, Walmart has launched a new advertising campaign with the slogan “Low prices. Every Day. On everything.”

The campaign features five 30-second TV spots ranging from an Easter egg hunt to a customer asking for a price match.

"Walmart’s reputation was founded on the principle of providing low prices day-in and day-out on the broadest assortment of merchandise," said Duncan Mac Naughton, chief merchandising officer of Walmart U.S. "Our company is determined to create the best one-stop shopping experience and low prices on the right products backed by a clear, consistent ad match policy."

As part of the initiative, Walmart has simplified the guidelines for its ad match policy. Customers no longer have to bring in a competitor’s ad, but Walmart will match at the register the price of local competitors’ printed ads for identical products, with some restrictions.

The discount store giant is also training associates to help ensure that the policy is executed consistently across all outlets.

In order to reinforce the EDLP message, buyers and store managers are checking competitors’ pricing more often, and Walmart is working with suppliers to obtain lower costs per item.

In addition, Walmart is expanding its store assortments by approximately 8,500 items — an increase of about 11% on average — to return to the shelves items that had been dropped as part of a SKU optimization effort that backfired by alienating customers.

In dry grocery, such products as pasta, beverages and snacks are being restored, while coming months will see additions to fresh food and such consumables as paper towels, toilet paper, detergent and health and beauty aids. Later this year, hard lines departments including elecronics, sporting goods, apparel, fabrics/crafts and outdoor living will be expanded.

"We’ve listened to our customers, and we’re bringing back the products and brands they want," Mac Naughton said. "Customers have already seen a wider selection of products on our shelves, and we’ll continue to bring back great products at great prices."

Advertisement